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The Flawed Logic of USA’s Supreme Court Judgement on Gay Marriage

In the wake of the US supreme court’s problematic judgement on gay marriage, some pundits have been proudly citing one particular section of the judgment, EG as repeated here –

http://www.vox.com/2015/6/26/8851207/supreme-court-marriage-equality-one-paragraph

“No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. … It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. …”

But this cuts to the core of why some feel that gay unions should not be referred to as ‘marriage’. Specifically, because half the time, gay relationships don’t embody “the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family”, because half the time they are not monogamous.

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8 Comments on “The Flawed Logic of USA’s Supreme Court Judgement on Gay Marriage”

  1. violetwisp says:

    I was wondering if you have a post that explicitly addresses how you believe a Christian who experiences same sex attractions should live their lives in terms of romance. I’d be interested to know if you think they should attempt a heterosexual marriage or just remain celibate.

    • stasisonline says:

      Hi Violetwisp. No, I don’t have a post that particularly addresses that question.

      My thinking is that if the person is bisexual, then Biblical marriage may be a good idea. But if they are basically gay, then non-marriage and non-romance may be best.

      This does raise questions on loneliness though. And I suspect that those who are single are best to share accommodation with others, and maintain good platonic friendships with others.

      • violetwisp says:

        Interesting. Do you know anyone who has managed this? I can’t imagine someone with an average sex drive and longing for natural human partnership could have a stable life like that.

      • stasisonline says:

        No, I don’t personally know anyone who has entirely managed it, but I know of several who try. EG Matt Moore, Joseph Samba, Julie Rogers. I guess part of the way of achieving it would be to avoid longing for a partner. If you consider how Catholic priests seem to achieve long-term singleness, you realise it can be done. But I bet it’s hard.

      • violetwisp says:

        Do you think that’s a fair comparison? A Catholic priest makes a conscious choice in full understanding as an adult with a developed sex drive of what they will miss out on.

      • stasisonline says:

        I don’t see the difference? How is one making a conscious choice, while the other is not? How does one involve full understanding as an adult, but the other does not? How does one have a developed sex drive, while the other does not?
        Someone entering the priesthood might have previously lost their virginity I suppose. Iikewise a gay person choosing celibacy might have previously lost their virginity. Or someone entering the priesthood might have always wanted to be a priest, and may never have lost their virginity because they were always aiming for a priestly life. Likewise a gay person might never have lost their virginity because they always saw celibacy as the right choice.

  2. […] Statis Online: a blog designed to “bring you alternate viewpoints to what is provided on one-eyed and misleading websites” specifically about homosexuality from their Christian point of view. […]

  3. […] “if they are basically gay, then non-marriage and non-romance may be best. This does raise questions on loneliness though. And I suspect that those who are single are best to share accommodation with others, and maintain good platonic friendships with others. … If you consider how Catholic priests seem to achieve long-term singleness, you realise it can be done.” Statis Online […]


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